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When measuring pilot aptitude, the following measuring dimensions are used in PILOT-360

1.

Basic mental abilities

Components are:

Measured by Monitoring, Flight Management

2.

Composite mental abilities

Components are:

Note: These dimensions are related to aeroplane flight path management, manual control and automation

3.

Operational abilities

Components are:

4.

English language proficiency

Components are:

Measured by Spelling, Grammar, Complete the Sentence, Idiom & Synonyms

TEST DESIGN: THE PILOT 360
COGNITIVE CORE

When measuring pilot aptitude, PILOT-360 uses 3 measuring dimensions, which are subdivided in measuring aspects.

There are 6 Tests composing the PILOT-360 Cognitive Core Measurement Engine:

Monitoring
Working memory
Flight Management
Number Series
Spatial Orientation
Logical reasoning

Some PILOT-360 Tests, such as Flight Management and Monitoring, participate in the validation of several measuring aspects.

Each measuring aspect is verified using one or several PILOT-360’s tests according to the table below.

Measuring dimension

Measuring aspect

PILOT-360 test

Basic mental abilities

Composite mental abilities

Operational abilities

Measuring dimension

✓ Basic mental abilities

Measuring aspect

PILOT-360 test​

Measuring dimension

✓ Composite mental abilities

Measuring aspect

PILOT-360 test​

Measuring dimension

✓ Operational abilities

Measuring aspect

PILOT-360 test​

TEST DESIGN: PILOT 360
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCY

The measuring aspects are:

Measured by 4 tests:

Measuring dimension

✓ ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Measuring dimension

Measuring aspect

PILOT-360 test

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Monitoring

Monitoring is a critical competency for pilots and encompasses several key aspects, including speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, and situational awareness. Here’s an in-depth exploration of why monitoring is essential for pilots:

Speed and Accuracy of Information Processing

Pilots must continually process a wide array of information, ranging from flight instruments and navigation charts to air traffic control communications and weather updates. Rapid and precise information processing is crucial for recognizing changes in the flight environment, identifying anomalies, and responding to critical situations promptly.

Monitoring Role: Effective monitoring involves constantly scanning and evaluating various data sources. This includes checking instruments for deviations from desired parameters, listening to radio communications for instructions or traffic reports, and reviewing navigational charts for position updates. By processing this information quickly and accurately, pilots can maintain an accurate understanding of the flight’s progress and respond to any deviations or issues.

Long-Term Concentration

Pilots often operate flights that can last for several hours, requiring sustained focus and vigilance. Maintaining concentration over extended periods is essential to detect subtle changes in the aircraft’s performance and environment, as well as to prevent lapses in attention.

Monitoring Role: Pilots need to be attentive to the aircraft’s systems and performance indicators throughout the entire flight. This involves monitoring the engines, fuel levels, navigation systems, and other critical components. By sustaining long-term concentration, pilots can identify issues as they develop, respond to changes in fuel efficiency, and ensure that the aircraft remains on
course.

Situational Awareness

Situational awareness involves understanding the broader context of the flight, including factors like weather conditions, air traffic, and the operational status of the aircraft. Pilots must maintain situational awareness to anticipate changes and respond effectively.

Monitoring Role: Situational awareness is heavily reliant on monitoring the evolving situation. Pilots need to continuously assess their position in relation to other aircraft, be aware of weather developments along the route, and monitor changes in air traffic patterns. This information is essential for making strategic decisions, such as adjusting the flight path to avoid turbulence or coordinating with air traffic control to ensure safe separation from other aircraft.

Effective monitoring is a dynamic and ongoing process that supports safe and efficient flight operations. It involves regular cross-checking of instruments and systems, verifying that the aircraft is operating within established parameters, and staying aware of the environment both inside and outside the cockpit.

Monitoring is particularly critical during critical phases of flight, such as takeoff, landing, and in-flight emergencies. In these situations, the speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, and situational awareness become even more vital. Monitoring contributes to the early detection of any anomalies or deviations from the flight plan, enabling pilots to take corrective actions and maintain flight safety.

In summary, monitoring is a core competency for pilots as it ensures the continuous assessment of critical information, contributes to the speed and accuracy of information processing, sustains long-term concentration, and bolsters situational awareness. It plays a pivotal role in maintaining safety throughout the flight and allows pilots to respond effectively to changing conditions and unforeseen challenges.

PILOT-360 Measuring aspects:

Working Memory

This test has been designed to measure the candidate’s ability to monitor constantly changing information in a constant environment (simulating the cockpit) and to accurately reproduce this information when requested. After correctly reproducing information, the amount of information that needs to be monitored, and thus accurately needs to be reproduced, increases.

Working memory is a crucial cognitive function for pilots, as it plays a central role in several competencies necessary for safe and effective aviation. Here’s an in-depth look at why working memory is important for pilots, considering memory capacity, speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, and situational awareness:

Speed and Accuracy of Information Processing

Memory capacity refers to the amount of information that can be temporarily held and manipulated in the mind. For pilots, this is vital as they need to retain and process a substantial amount of information, such as air traffic control instructions, navigation charts, checklists, and emergency procedures. Working memory enables them to maintain this information actively for immediate use.

Memory Capacity

Memory capacity refers to the amount of information that can be temporarily held and manipulated in the mind. For pilots, this is vital as they need to retain and process a substantial amount of information, such as air traffic control instructions, navigation charts, checklists, and emergency procedures. Working memory enables them to maintain this information actively for immediate use.

Long-Term Concentration

Long-term concentration is essential for pilots, especially during extended flights that can last for several hours. Working memory helps maintain focus on the task at hand, ensuring that they remain attentive to their responsibilities and the evolving situation. It assists in managing mental fatigue and preventing lapses in attention.

Situational Awareness

Situational awareness encompasses a pilot’s understanding of the broader context of the flight, including the positions of other aircraft, weather conditions, and the status of the aircraft itself. Working memory is instrumental in retaining this information and updating it in real-time. A strong working memory allows pilots to juggle multiple pieces of data simultaneously, such as their current heading, altitude, nearby air traffic, and changing weather patterns, all of which are critical for maintaining situational awareness.

In aviation, working memory enables pilots to handle the constant flow of information and make informed decisions in real-time. It is especially important during various phases of a flight, including takeoff, cruising, descent, and landing, where pilots must manage multiple tasks and adapt to evolving circumstances.

Moreover, working memory plays a pivotal role in decision-making during emergencies. It allows pilots to recall and apply emergency procedures swiftly and accurately, contributing to the safe resolution of critical situations. In scenarios such as engine failures, severe weather encounters, or system malfunctions, working memory helps pilots navigate through a checklist of actions efficiently and in a precise sequence.

In conclusion, working memory is a foundational cognitive ability for pilots, supporting their memory capacity, speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, and situational awareness. It is an indispensable tool that enables pilots to manage information, process data rapidly, maintain focus during extended flights, and make well-informed decisions to ensure the safety of the aircraft, its occupants, and those in the surrounding airspace.

PILOT-360 Measuring aspects:

Spatial Orientation

This test has been designed to measure the candidate’s spatial ability to move around based on an audio heading (North, South, East and West) and to accurately supply the correct answer when requested. After correctly supplying the correct movements, the amount of time that the candidate has to make a decision decreases.

Spatial orientation, speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, situational awareness, and the management of information are all critical competencies for pilots due to their fundamental roles in ensuring flight safety and successful aircraft operations. Let’s explore each of these competencies in detail:

Spatial Orientation

Spatial orientation, also known as spatial awareness or spatial intelligence, is the ability to maintain an accurate mental representation of the aircraft’s position and attitude in relation to the Earth’s surface. This includes knowing the aircraft’s altitude, heading, pitch, and roll.

Importance: Accurate spatial orientation is vital for safe navigation, especially during adverse weather conditions, low visibility, or instrument flight. Pilots must be able to interpret flight instruments and external visual cues to maintain level flight, make turns, and execute controlled descents and climbs. Without a strong spatial orientation, pilots can become disoriented and lose control of the aircraft.

Speed and Accuracy of Information Processing

Speed and accuracy in processing information are essential for pilots to quickly assess and respond to changing conditions during a flight.

Importance: Pilots encounter a constant flow of information, including data from flight instruments, communication with air traffic control, weather updates, and more. Rapid processing ensures they can make informed decisions in a timely manner. Delayed or inaccurate processing can lead to critical errors, especially in high-stress situations.

Long-Term Concentration

Long-term concentration refers to the ability to maintain focus and vigilance over extended periods, which is crucial during lengthy flights.

Importance: Distractions, monotony, and fatigue can pose challenges during long flights. Pilots must stay attentive to detect subtle changes in the aircraft’s performance, environment, or systems. Maintaining concentration over hours or even transcontinental flights is essential to ensuring safety and responding to unforeseen events.

Situational Awareness

Situational awareness is a pilot’s comprehension of the broader context of the flight, including factors like weather, air traffic, and the operational status of the aircraft.

Importance: Effective situational awareness enables pilots to anticipate and respond to changing conditions, make strategic decisions, and adapt to evolving circumstances. It helps them avoid conflicts with other aircraft, navigate around severe weather, and take appropriate actions in emergency situations.

Situation Awareness and Management of Information

Importance: Efficient management of information ensures that pilots can access the right data at the right time. It involves effective communication within the cockpit, sharing critical information with the crew, and staying organized. Confusion or miscommunication can have serious consequences in aviation.

Situation awareness is closely related to the broader concept of information management. Pilots must filter, prioritize, and organize information to maintain a clear understanding of the current situation.

In conclusion, spatial orientation, speed and accuracy of information processing, long-term concentration, situational awareness, and the management of information are all foundational competencies for pilots. They are central to ensuring flight safety, enabling pilots to navigate, communicate, and respond effectively to a range of challenges and scenarios that may arise during the course of a flight. Without these competencies, the risk of errors and accidents in aviation would significantly increase, making them indispensable for every pilot.

PILOT-360 Measuring aspects:

Flight Management

This test has been designed to measure the candidate’s ability to apply multitasking to correctly perform three tasks at the same time, namely:

Pilots face a multitude of challenges and responsibilities during flight, and their ability to perform tasks efficiently and effectively is critical for ensuring the safety of the aircraft, crew, and passengers. Here’s an in-depth look at why various cognitive and psychomotor skills are important for pilots:

Multi-tasking

Pilots are often required to manage multiple tasks simultaneously, such as navigating, communicating with air traffic control, monitoring aircraft systems, and making critical decisions. The ability to multitask effectively is crucial, as it allows pilots to handle various responsibilities without losing situational awareness.

Speed and Accuracy of Information Processing

Pilots must process a vast amount of information quickly and accurately. This includes interpreting data from flight instruments, weather reports, and communication with air traffic control. Rapid information processing ensures that pilots can respond promptly to changing conditions and make precise decisions.

Long-term Concentration

Flights can be long and monotonous, especially on long-haul routes. Pilots must maintain their concentration over extended periods, as their vigilance is essential for detecting and responding to potential hazards or deviations from the flight plan.

Situational Awareness

Situational awareness refers to a pilot’s understanding of their current environment and the ability to anticipate future developments. Pilots must be acutely aware of factors such as weather conditions, air traffic, aircraft performance, and their own physical and mental state. Maintaining situational awareness is fundamental to making informed decisions during a flight.

Situation Awareness and Management of Information

Pilots need to manage a constant stream of information, both inside and outside the cockpit. Effective situation awareness and information management involve filtering out irrelevant data, prioritizing critical information, and ensuring that all crew members are on the same page. This skill is vital for efficient communication and decision-making.

Problem Solving and Decision-Making

Pilots encounter various problems and challenges during flights, from mechanical issues to unexpected weather conditions. The ability to analyze complex situations, identify problems, and make well-informed decisions under pressure is crucial for resolving issues and maintaining flight safety.

Workload Management

The workload for pilots can vary throughout a flight. During takeoff, landing, or emergency situations, it can be particularly high. Pilots must manage their workload effectively, distributing tasks among the crew and prioritizing actions to ensure that critical duties are not overlooked.

Allocation of Attention

Pilots need to allocate their attention appropriately to different tasks and monitor them continuously. They must know when to focus on a specific task, such as communication with air traffic control, and when to shift their attention to other essential aspects of flight, like navigation or system monitoring.

Psychomotor Abilities

These involve the coordination of physical movements and reactions, such as operating the aircraft’s controls, managing the throttle, and making precise adjustments. Accurate and timely psychomotor responses are critical, especially during take-off, landing, and emergency situations.

In summary, pilots require a wide range of cognitive and psychomotor skills to effectively manage the complexities and challenges of aviation. These skills are essential for maintaining safety, making informed decisions, and responding to a wide array of scenarios that can arise during flight. The ability to multitask, process information rapidly, maintain concentration, and manage situational awareness are all crucial elements in the successful performance of a pilot’s duties.

PILOT-360 Measuring aspects:

Logical Reasoning & Number Series

These two reasoning tests have been developed to assess the candidate ability to apply reasoning skills to deduct the correct answer by analysing the connection between the information given.

Logical reasoning and number series tests are important components of pilot assessments for several reasons:

Cognitive Abilities

Pilots are responsible for operating complex aircraft and making critical decisions during flights. These decisions can involve navigation, responding to emergencies, and managing various systems on the aircraft. Logical reasoning and number series tests assess cognitive abilities such as problem-solving, critical thinking, and the ability to make quick and accurate decisions. These skills are essential for ensuring the safety of both the aircraft and its passengers.

Mental Agility

Pilots often face dynamic and rapidly changing situations while in the cockpit. Logical reasoning and number series tests help assess a pilot’s mental agility and adaptability. The ability to quickly process information, identify patterns, and make logical decisions under pressure is crucial for handling unexpected situations, adverse weather conditions, and other challenges that may arise during a flight.

Attention to Detail

Pilots must pay close attention to details and follow complex checklists and procedures. Logical reasoning and number series tests can evaluate a candidate’s attention to detail and their ability to follow specific instructions accurately. A small mistake or oversight can have serious consequences in aviation, so this skill is of utmost importance.

Pattern Recognition

Aviation involves a lot of pattern recognition, whether it’s in interpreting instrument readings, monitoring the aircraft’s systems, or identifying navigational waypoints. Logical reasoning and number series tests assess an individual’s ability to recognize patterns and make sense of data, which is vital for interpreting information and taking appropriate actions during a flight.

Problem Solving

Logical reasoning tests present candidates with various types of problems, which can be useful in evaluating their problem-solving skills. Pilots often encounter challenges that require creative solutions, especially in emergency situations. Being able to think critically and come up with innovative solutions is a valuable skill for a pilot.

Stress Management

Pilots must remain calm and composed in high-pressure situations. Logical reasoning and number series tests can simulate some of the stress and time constraints that pilots may experience, helping assess how well a candidate can manage stress and maintain focus under such conditions.

Training and Selection

Airlines and aviation authorities use these tests as part of the selection process for aspiring pilots and also for the ongoing training and assessment of current pilots. Identifying and developing these cognitive skills can enhance the safety and effectiveness of the pilot workforce.

Standardization

Logical reasoning and number series tests provide a standardized way to assess a pilot’s cognitive abilities, making it easier for aviation organizations to compare candidates and determine their suitability for pilot roles.

In conclusion, logical reasoning and number series tests are important for pilot assessments because they help identify individuals who possess the cognitive abilities and mental acuity necessary to excel in a demanding and safety-critical profession. These tests are used to select the best candidates and ensure that pilots can handle the complexities and challenges of modern aviation.

PILOT-360 Measuring aspects: